Please note: The Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex is not open to the public. Final in-person viewing took place on May 25.

The corpse flower live stream on our YouTube channel has ended, but you can view the live stream archive here

We have exciting news from the Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex at Temple Ambler!

We have our first-ever giant corpse flower bloom! The giant corpse flower (Amorphophallus titanum) produces the world's largest unbranched inflorescence, or flower structure.

A flowering corpse flower is a truly rare event considering that it takes seven to 10 years for the plant to bloom. To have two is extraordinary, which is exactly what is happening at the Greenhouse! The big bloom has a "Mini-me!"

Corpse Flowers do an excellent job of living up to the name. When they bloom, they will smell like rotting meat. Unlike other flowers that use their scent to attract bees and butterflies as pollinators, the corpse flower sends out its eye-watering odor to attract flies and beetles.

Be sure to stop back at Corpse Flower Central for all of the latest news about these marvelously strange blooms!

Details on public viewing of the corpse flower are below.

Registration for In-person Viewing

Please note: The Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex is not open to the public. Final in-person viewing took place on May 25.

The price for in-person visiting will be $15 for general admission and $10 for Ambler Arboretum members, and Temple University students and alumni. Proceeds supported the Tyler School of Art and Architecture Horticulture program and the Ambler Arboretum of Temple University. Parking will be in the Temple Ambler Visitors Lot/Parking Lot 1, off of Meetinghouse Road.

Visit https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus to view the corpse flower online.

Daily Updates

Thursday, May 27

Big Stinker and Little Stinker
Little Stinker the Corpse Flower

It's the moment you've all been waiting for! It is time to announce the winning names in the "Name the Corpse Flowers" contest! Thank you to everyone who entered! We had a whole treasure trove of creative, kooky, strange and downright bizarre suggestions (appropriate for these plants). But you can't go wrong with the classics.

Everyone, meet "Big Stinker," suggested by Sam and "Lil Stinker," suggested by Karen Johnson! Sam and Karen, we will be in touch soon on how to claim your tickets to Temple Ambler in Bloom, the Ambler Arboretum's annual garden party, on Saturday, September 11! 

The blooms of these two marvelous macabre, endangered corpse flowers has been quite a journey. Thank you for coming along with us! Corpse flowers or no, there is plenty to see, do learn and experience at Temple Ambler. We look forward to seeing you on campus!

Please note: The Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex is not open to the public. Final in-person viewing took place on May 25. The live feed has ended, but you can view the archive: https://bit.ly/3wCcP7h.

Wednesday, May 26

Viewing the Corpse Flowers at Temple Ambler

All good things, even corpse flowers, must come to an end. We have had two wildly unique blooms in two weeks! For everyone who was able to come out and visit our blooms, be sure to share your pictures and tag us @TempleAmbler!

There is still one bit of business to attend to, however, the naming of the plants. We will be announcing the names of the "Name the Corpse Flowers" contest winners tomorrow! Stay tuned!

Fun Fact: Last night was, no joke, a “Super Flower Blood Moon” … because of course it was.

Please note: The Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex is not open to the public. Final in-person viewing took place on May 25. The live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus will continue through today.

Tuesday, May 25

Viewing the corpse flowers at Temple Ambler

This is it! If you want to see our second corpse flower bloom, today is the day! Registration is open for in-person visits! Register online here: https://bit.ly/3wtYw4L. Viewing times will continue today from now through 10 p.m. Then that’s it (at least until we get another bloom somewhere down the road).

Visitors must register online prior to coming to campus. Walk-ins will not be able to enter the Greenhouse. Registration must take place prior to your visit. Temple University COVID-19 procedures will be in place. Social distancing will be observed and masks are required. 

The price for in-person visiting is $15 for general admission and $10 for Ambler Arboretum members, and Temple University students and alumni. Proceeds benefit the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Horticulture program and the Ambler Arboretum. Parking is in the Temple Ambler Visitors Lot/Parking Lot 1, off of Meetinghouse Road.

Visit our YouTube live feed of the bloom at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. Get creative and "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We’ll be announcing the winners this week!

Monday, May 24

Corpse flowers blooming at Temple Ambler

IT’S HAPPENING…AGAIN! Our second corpse flower has begun to bloom! Registration is now open for in-person viewing and smelling! Register online. Viewing times will be available tonight, Monday, May 24, from 5 p.m. to Midnight and Tuesday, May 25, from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Visitors must register online prior to coming to campus. Walk-ins will not be able to enter the Greenhouse. Registration must take place prior to your visit. Temple University COVID-19 procedures will be in place. Social distancing will be observed and masks are required. 

The price for in-person visiting is $15 for general admission and $10 for Ambler Arboretum members, and Temple University students and alumni. Proceeds benefit the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Horticulture program and the Ambler Arboretum. Parking is in the Temple Ambler Visitors Lot/Parking Lot 1, off of Meetinghouse Road.

Visit our YouTube live feed of the bloom at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus and visit Corpse Flower Central - https://ambler.temple.edu/corpseflower - for all of the latest news. Get creative and "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We’ll be announcing the winners this week!

Sunday, May 23

Second corpse flower at Temple Ambler

Sunday height check! Our little corpse flower that could added another inch of growth last night and is now standing tall at 52 inches! The forecast for when it will bloom remains “any day now.” When the flower does bloom, we will share all of the registration details about how you can see and smell our second corpse flower in person! So, keep an eye on this space and keep following the live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus!

Don’t forget to put in your entry for "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We will announce the winners after the second bloom!

Saturday, May 22

Corpse Flowers at Temple Ambler

Here’s your Saturday height check from the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex! Our not-so-little second corpse flower grew another inch since yesterday and is now 51 inches tall.

We all know how wonderfully weird the corpse flower is. What you may not know is that they are endangered. The giant corpse flower is listed as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Due to its naturally restricted geographical habitat (western Sumatra), the corpse flower is particularly susceptible to a number of threats, the highest being deforestation and habitat destruction.

“While these plants are being cultivated ex situ, or outside their natural range, many of these specimens are decedents of a small number of introductions. As a result, the genetic diversity in cultivated corpse flowers is relatively low,” said Greenhouse Manager Benjamin Snyder. “This can lead to a loss of genetic vigor through repeated inbreeding. Work is now being done to introduce wild genetic stock through pollinating cultivated corpse flowers with pollen collected from wild populations. This will help ensure the successful preservation of the species in the event of continued decline in natural populations." 

Follow the second flower on our YouTube live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. You can still "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We will announce the winners after the second bloom!

Friday, May 21

Today, we’re going to share a little “Corpse Flower Bloom 101,” aka, the telltale signs a corpse flower is getting ready to bloom. According to Ben Snyder, Manager of the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex, there are a number of signs pointing towards a corpse flower opening.

“First, the outer protective bracts begin to fall away (you can see that now with the flower on the live feed). Another aspect to watch is the overall growth pattern of the flower bud — as the bud first emerges from the soil, growth is typically slow,” he said. “As time progresses, however, growth speeds up, sometimes reaching 5 to 6 inches in 24 hours. As the bud nears maturity (i.e., opening), growth slows down significantly. By reviewing the growth curve, you can predict how close you are to it opening. Finally, the coloration of the spathe will begin to turn purple towards the bottom."

Follow the second flower on our YouTube live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. You can still "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We will announce the winners after the second bloom!

Thursday, May 20

Viewing the Corpse Flowers

Today, we’re journeying back to those misty bygone days of…last Sunday and Monday. Temple University photographer Betsy Manning has created a wonderful pictorial essay of the our corpse flower bloom in the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex. Visit https://bit.ly/3fxolKu to check it out!

Now if you didn’t get to see the first bloom, not to worry! Our second bloom, now standing tall at 48.75 inches, is set to bloom in the coming week! As with the first bloom, registration details for in-person viewing will be shared the day that the flower blooms. Please note that the Greenhouse is currently closed to the public.  

Follow the second flower’s on our YouTube live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. You can still "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We will announce the winners after the second bloom!

Wednesday, May 19

Corpse flower blooming at Temple Ambler

So, you might be wondering, what happens to the big flower now? We posed the question to Ben Snyder, Manager of the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex.

“Since we chose not to pollinate our bloom, the inflorescence will continue to ‘senesce,’ or die off. Had we pollinated it with pollen from another corpse flower, it would have begun to form a large cluster of red fruits at the base,” he said. “Once the inflorescence completely collapses and separates from the tuber, it will be removed and the tuber will be allowed to rest. This rest period may last a few weeks or a few months, after which the plant will enter a vegetative stage by sending up a large, umbrella-like leaf. This leaf will generate energy for the tuber through photosynthesis and start the process of building up enough storage reserves to flower again in three to four years.

The second flower added another two inches last night and is now 48 inches tall! Keep track of the second flower’s progress on our YouTube live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. Visit Corpse Flower Central - https://ambler.temple.edu/corpseflower - for all of the latest news. You can still "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We will announce the winners after the second bloom!

Tuesday, May 18

Smelling the corpse flower

We have now witnessed the rise and fall of our marvelously macabre big corpse flower bloom! But, as they say on TV, wait, that’s not all! Don’t forget that the smaller bloom is now on deck! While the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex is currently closed to the public, we do expect the other flower to bloom sometime between May 21 to May 31. As with the first bloom, registration details for in-person viewing will be shared the day that the flower blooms.

The small bloom isn’t so small anymore! It’s now standing tall at 46 inches, an additional 4.5 inches since Sunday!

We will continue to track the second flower on our YouTube live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. You can still "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. We will announce the winners after the second bloom!

Monday, May 17 - Part III

Corpse Flowers at Temple Ambler

Nature is a funny thing. Corpse flowers only last for a short period of time, usually 24 to 36 hours. Our big flower has given its all! If you have registered for this evening’s viewing, we certainly welcome you to stop by. If you prefer to wait until the smaller flower blooms, likely between May 24 and 31, we’ll honor your registration for that time. We look forward to seeing you on campus!  

Be sure to visit https://ambler.temple.edu/corpseflower for the latest information. The live stream will also continue to keep an eye on the smaller bloom – https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus.  

Monday, May 17 - Part II

How did our corpse flower grow? This time-lapse video from the Philadelphia Inquirer will give you some excellent insight! Be sure to check out the whole story here: https://bit.ly/2Qua0pE. You can also check out a story by Philadelphia Magazine here: https://bit.ly/3wcSwxg.

Monday, May 17

Corpse flowers at Temple Ambler

Here it is, in all of its big, blooming glory! If you visited last night or are visiting today, be sure to share your pictures and videos and hashtag us @TempleAmbler and/or #TUACorpseFlower! You still have a chance to see the flower in person today, and get a huge whiff yourself! Register online at https://bit.ly/3tTJGTs. Viewing times will be available today, Monday, May 17, from now through 10 p.m.

Visitors must register online prior to coming to campus. Walk-ins will not be able to enter the Tyler School of Art and Architecture Greenhouse Education and Research Complex. Registration must take place prior to your visit. Temple University COVID-19 procedures will be in place. Social distancing will be observed and masks are required.

The price for in-person visiting is $15 for general admission and $10 for Ambler Arboretum members, and Temple University students and alumni. Proceeds benefit the Temple Horticulture program in the Tyler School of Art and Architecture, Temple University Horticulture program and the Ambler Arboretum. Parking will be in the Temple Ambler Visitors Lot/Parking Lot 1, off of Meetinghouse Road.

Visit https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus to view the corpse flowers online.

Sunday, May 16

Blooming corpse flowers

Update to the update! The flower is blooming! Registration for in-person viewing is now open! Register online here!

It’s time for a Sunday afternoon height check from the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex! Our large bloom edged up a little to 59.25 inches — the slowing growth means we’re getting closer to bloom time! The little corpse flower that could added another 2.5 inches and is now 41.5 inches tall!

Visit our YouTube live feed of the blooms  at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. Get creative and "Name the Corpse Flowers" here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR. Winners will be announced soon!

Saturday, May 15

A Saturday corpse flower height check from the Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Greenhouse Education and Research Complex!  The large bloom added another inch to its already impressive stature and is now 59 inches tall. The not-so-small one shot up another 2.5 inches and is now 39 inches tall — that’s a growth spurt of 9.5 inches since Tuesday!

Visit our YouTube live feed of the blooms at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. "Name the Corpse Flowers" by entering your bloom name ideas here: https://bit.ly/3eKK8yR.

Please note: The Greenhouse is not currently open to the public. Registration information for how you can see the corpse flowers in person will be released on the day the big flower blooms.

Friday, May 14

Corpse flowers at Temple Ambler

It could be any day now! Be sure to keep an eye on our live feed at https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus to view the corpse flowers online! A new height check for Friday! It was a good night for growth in both plants. The big bloom is now 58 inches tall, 1.25 inches overnight. The smaller flower is now 36.5 inches tall and added 3 inches from yesterday! Want to be a part of corpse flower history? Be sure to get in your entries for "Name The Corpse Flowers!" 

Thursday, May 13

Benjamin Snyder, Greenhouse Manager

Today we’d like to introduce you to Ben Snyder, the Manager of the Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex at Temple Ambler, an alumnus of the Tyler School of Art and Arcitecture’s Horticulture program, and the reason we’ve been talking about corpse flowers all week. Ben has been growing and nurturing these wonderfully bizarre blooms for several years now. Hop on over here to learn nine things to know about the giant corpse flower.

Visit https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus to view the corpse flowers online and be sure to get your entry in to name this weird duo!

Today’s height check: The big bloom is now 56.75 inches tall, just a little taller than yesterday. The little bloom grew another inch and a half and is now 33.5 inches!

Please note: The Greenhouse is not currently open to the public. Details on public viewing of the corpse flowers and how to register are coming soon!

Wednesday, May 12

Corpse flowers at Temple Ambler.

A quick update on our two blooms! The big bloom grew another 2.75 inches overnight and is standing tall at 56.25 inches. The smaller bloom grew by 2.5 inches and is now 32 inches tall!

You now have the opportunity to be a part of corpse flower history by taking part in Name The Corpse Flowers! To enter, just fill out the entry form online. Full details are below. 

Tuesday, May 11

Corpse Flowers at Temple Ambler

Are you sitting down? We hope you are because we have more corpse flower news to share. Our big bloom has a “Mini-me!” That’s right, there isn’t just one corpse flower blooming in the Ambler Campus Greenhouse Education and Research Complex, there’s two! The little plant is a good bit smaller than its big brother measuring in today at 29.5 inches, but it will still be just as stinky when it blooms! The large bloom grew another 2.25 inches since yesterday!

You want to see them, right? Of course you do and now you can! View a live feed of both blooms on the Ambler Campus YouTube page – https://youtube.com/TempleUniversityAmblerCampus. Like and subscribe while you’re there! For the sake of the well-being of our plants, the Greenhouse will go dark each night. The live feed will pick back up each morning.  

Monday, May 10

Corpse flower at Temple Ambler

The corpse flower grew four inches from Sunday to Monday and is now 51.25-inches tall! The central spadix is beginning to turn the characteristic purple color. Based on the growth patterns and other features, the flower is set to bloom at some time between late this week and mid-late next week for full opening. Nature being nature, it is difficult to pinpoint an exact date yet.

Name the Corpse Flowers!

Viewing the corpse flowers

Have you heard the news (of course you have)? Two rare corpse flowers are about to bloom in the Ambler Campus Greenhouse Education and Research Complex!

What you haven’t heard is a name for the flowers! Amorphophallus titanum, that’s a corpse flower to you and me, are only named when they bloom. We want to be ready so it’s time for the game that’s sweeping the nation — Name The Corpse Flowers!

This is where you come in. We’re giving everyone the chance to Name The Corpse Flowers! With the big bloom and its “Mini-me,” you have two blooms to name!

To enter, just fill out the entry form online. If your Corpse Flower name is chosen, you will win two tickets to Temple Ambler in Bloom, the Ambler Arboretum’s annual garden party, which will be held on Saturday, September 11, 2021. The winning entries will be announced shortly after the corpse flower fully blooms! 

Be creative and keep it clean! This is family programming!  

A Hot Time in the Ambler Campus Greenhouse

Thermogenesis in corpse flowers

Did you know that a corpse flower generates its own heat? According to Ben Snyder, Manager of the Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex at Temple Ambler, the Amorphophallus titanum also goes through "thermogenesis." It can generate its own heat to a level that nearly mimics human body temperature, just another way to fool its pollinators.

“It’s a technique that isn’t unique to the Amorphophallus. Our native skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) blooms early; it can melt the snow around the flower,” he said. “And yes, as the name suggests, they also stink and rely on flies and beetles as pollinators. They are in the same plant family, Araceae, as the Amorphophallus.”

Get Ready for Night (or Day) of the Living Dead

Viewing the corpse flowers

Benjamin Snyder, Manager of the Tyler School of Art and Architecture's Greenhouse Education and Research Complex at Temple Ambler, has a particular passion for the fascinating “oddballs” of the plant world.

“Our collection includes many plants that were collected in the wild, as well as rare items that you’re not going to easily find and replace,” said Snyder, a graduate of the Temple Tyler School of Art and Architecture’s Horticulture program. “We have some wonderful species, such as Bird of Paradise, flowering cacti and lots of orchids, including the coconut pie orchid, which remarkably smells exactly like you think it would."

Take the Amorphophallus titanum, also known as the corpse flower, the largest "unbranched inflorescence” in the world. The tallest flowers grow to about seven feet in height while the leaves spread a full 12 feet and the tuber weighs in at a monster 150 pounds. Snyder is currently growing several of them, some of which are as tall or taller than he is.

“Our Amorphophallus have been grown from seed donated by Ohio State University in 2017 and Dartmouth College in 2019,” Snyder said. “You have to be patient with these plants as it typically takes seven to 10 years for them to flower and, in some instances, it can take up to 15 years.” Learn more about the Corpse Flowers at Temple Ambler.

The Ambler Arboretum - Our Campus is Our Classroom

While you're learning more about our corpse flower, why not take a little time to learn more about the Ambler Arboretum? The Ambler Arboretum of Temple University is an educational resource modeling the art and science of horticulture and environmental responsibility while fostering research, celebrating the achievements of women in horticulture, preserving the historic significance of the campus and highlighting the health benefits of nature, plants and gardening. The Ambler Arboretum of Temple University is proud to be a part of America’s Garden Capital.

Follow Us Online

Find out what's happening at Temple Ambler and the Ambler Arboretum! Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Share pictures from your experiences on Instagram. Use #AmblerCampus. Temple Ambler is also on YouTubeVisit and subscribe to our page - youtube.com/templeuniversityamblercampus for student profiles, projects, research, Arboretum tours, sustainability tips, citizen science, special events and corpse flowers, of course!